Movie Reviews

‘Blue Is the Warmest Color’: The birth and demise of a relationship

By Wang DexianMovies - 03 May 2014 11:00 AM | Updated 12:33 PM

‘Blue Is the Warmest Color’: The birth and demise of a relationship

Our Rating

5/5 Stars

‘Blue Is the Warmest Color’ is a film that has certainly made its name known over the past year.
 
The film won the director Abdellatif Kechiche the prestigious Palme d'Or at the Cannes International Film Festival, and also made history with actresses Adele Exarchopoulos and Lea Seydoux receiving the award, making them the only other women besides director Jane Campion to be bestowed the honour.
 
The film also made headlines for, and to quote Justin Chang of Variety magazine, “the most explosively graphic lesbian sex scenes in recent memory”. It is this that caused the film to be released in Singapore with eight minutes chopped off.
 
The movie revolves around Adele (Exarchopoulos), a 15-year-old high school student who one day notices a woman with blue hair and is instantly enamoured with her, dreaming and fantasising about her in a sexual way.
 
Even though she is dating a boy at her school, she is ultimately dissatisfied with the budding relationship and breaks up with him. Just then, that very woman with the blue hair, art student Emma (Seydoux), enters Adele's life for real. Love and lust follow.
 
ENGROSSING PERFORMANCE
 
The film runs an epic three hours and covers plenty of ground. For a movie that long and that has no superhero or special effects of buildings collapsing, it certainly retains the attention of the viewer remarkably well.

Director Kechiche does this by focusing on the many complicated elements of Adele's journey through adolescence – namely, the sexual awakening and curiosity, the difficulties of coming out as a homosexual, and most importantly, the organic formation and eventual devastation of Adele and Emma's relationship.
 
The lovely Exarchopoulos gives a totally engrossing performance, one that is rooted in the low-key appeal of a girl coming to terms with her own attractiveness as she approaches womanhood.
 
Her polar opposite is Emma, who is loud, even obnoxious. It is through the strong, intense performances of the two leads, in particular the breakout performance of Exarchopoulos, that we come to explore the alchemy between the two.
 
PACKED WITH SUBSTANCE
 
Issues such as the class divide in France is juxtaposed organically in the movie as a recurring theme through the use of visual symbolism in Adele's life.
 
Even food and fashion are used as tools to express changes in the views of the characters, in philosophy and ideals, something very much discussed in the film by the characters themselves.
 
Stripped of the controversy that has surrounded it, ‘Blue Is the Warmest Color’ is a remarkable piece of work.
 
With stellar performances from the two leads and some stunning visual language, the movie manages to convincingly capture everything about the experience of falling in love right through to its breakdown.
It is brutally honesty, intelligent, thoughtful yet warm and tender – an ode to the messy entanglements we face on the road to find love.
 
‘Blue Is The Warmest Color’ is now showing in cinemas

Blue Is the Warmest Color

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  • Blue Is The Warmest Color 2014
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  • Blue Is The Warmest Color 2014
  • Blue Is The Warmest Color 2014
  • Blue Is The Warmest Color 2014
  • Blue Is The Warmest Color 2014
  • Blue Is The Warmest Color 2014
  • Blue Is The Warmest Color 2014
  • Blue Is The Warmest Color 2014
Blue Is The Warmest Color