Movie Reviews

Movie Review: The Hurricane Heist - almost so bad it's good

By Jedd JongMovies - 04 April 2018 11:00 AM | Updated 06 April 2018

Movie Review: The Hurricane Heist - almost so bad it's good

In 1996, Rob Cohen’s Daylight involved a mix of traffic, crime and very inclement weather. Cohen revisits those elements in the delightfully-titled The Hurricane Heist.

A hurricane is about to hit the Gulf Coast of Alabama. A gang of thieves, led by corrupt U.S. Treasury officer Perkins (Ralph Ineson), has planned the perfect crime: make away with $600 million under the cover of the storm. Meteorologist Will (Toby Kebbell) and his mechanic brother, former U.S. Marine Breeze (Ryan Kwanten), must brave the hurricane and foil the audacious robbery. They join forces with Treasury Agent Casey (Maggie Grace), Perkins’ former partner, as the hurricane reaches Category 5 levels and the dastardly robbers get ever closer to making off with their loot.

When this reviewer first heard of The Hurricane Heist, he was surprised it wasn’t bound straight for home video/streaming. The plot and characters feel very made-for-TV, and the visual effects are often unconvincing. However, there is a good deal of practical stunt work that is executed with a level of skill.

The Hurricane Heist was always going to be silly. The challenge is for the film to cross that threshold into being entertaining, without making the audience feel like the movie is something they must endure. The movie is only partially successful in this regard. The first two acts of the film are often tedious and while there’s a lot going on during the action sequences, it feels kind of numbing. Then, the climactic chase involving three semi-trucks outracing the hurricane’s eye wall packs in the over-the-top action that the audience came for. It isn’t quite enough to make up for the earlier parts of the film, but it’s something.

Rob Cohen directed big-budget fare in the 90s and early 2000s, including Dragonheart and, as the poster is quick to remind us, The Fast and the Furious and xXx. Indeed, the font for the title on the poster seems suspiciously reminiscent of The Fast and the Furious. While those films have gotten increasingly extravagant, Cohen’s box office disappointments (including 2005’s Stealth) mean that he has to make do with limited resources. The film was shot in Bulgaria, the go-to location for budget-challenged Hollywood filmmakers.


Toby Kebbell makes for a more interesting leading man than the bland, generically handsome guys one would find leading movies of this type. He affects a Southern drawl which Kebbell seems to know is unconvincing but which he tries to keep consistent. He gets a laughably standard backstory and motivation, and there’s nothing here that’s remotely affecting on an emotional level, but Kebbell is clearly trying his best.

Touches like the hero’s brother being named ‘Breeze’ seem to indicate a certain level of self-awareness, but The Hurricane Heist always feels a notch or two away from peak B-movie enjoyment levels.


Maggie Grace is a serviceable leading lady, while Ralph Ineson happily chomps into the scenery as the villain. We’ve seen The Witch so we know Ineson is capable of nuance, but it’s just as well that he dispenses with anything resembling that, eventually yelling “MY MONEY!” as he tries to keep a speeding semi-truck with a storm front bearing down behind it under control.

The Hurricane Heist is packed with clichés and is aimed at undiscerning action movie fans looking to pass a lazy Sunday afternoon. The movie never feels insultingly cheap and there is a bit of charm to the less-than-convincing visual effects, but it never makes a commitment to the full-on stupidity that would’ve brought it into ‘so bad it’s good’ territory.

RATING: 2.5 out of 5 Stars

Our Rating

2/5 Stars
The Hurricane Heist